©grizzlysbear

August 29 2014 - 297 notes



greenthepress:

So who are the Koch Brothers anyways? 
Here are the facts: 
They have an enormous political influence: Associated Press said they are “shaping politics” this year, and three GOP candidates credited them for their success.
They are Big Oil barons, who made their fortune on oil refining and continue to get the bulk of their wealth from the fossil fuel industry.
They spend far more than any “liberal equivalents,” and they spend in line with their financial interests.
They use shady operations and "dark money" to fund their interests.
They pretend to advocate economic liberty, but they attack renewables exclusively while defending fossil fuels.
They claim to have a good environmental track record but their company is responsible for hundreds of oil spills, paid hundreds of millions in fines, and even caused deaths.
They push an extreme agenda. 
Read more Myths and Facts about the Koch Brothers
Photo from Greenpeace

greenthepress:

So who are the Koch Brothers anyways? 

Here are the facts: 

  • They have an enormous political influence: Associated Press said they are “shaping politics” this year, and three GOP candidates credited them for their success.
  • They are Big Oil barons, who made their fortune on oil refining and continue to get the bulk of their wealth from the fossil fuel industry.
  • They spend far more than any “liberal equivalents,” and they spend in line with their financial interests.
  • They use shady operations and "dark money" to fund their interests.
  • They pretend to advocate economic liberty, but they attack renewables exclusively while defending fossil fuels.
  • They claim to have a good environmental track record but their company is responsible for hundreds of oil spills, paid hundreds of millions in fines, and even caused deaths.
  • They push an extreme agenda. 

Read more Myths and Facts about the Koch Brothers

Photo from Greenpeace





August 28 2014 - 172 notes



iwanttoberecycled:

I want to be an essential step.

iwanttoberecycled:

I want to be an essential step.

(Source: recyclart)





August 28 2014 - 3 notes







August 28 2014 - 0 notes



Volvo Introduces the World’s First Car Equipped With Pedestrian Airbags





August 27 2014 - 0 notes



8 foods you can reuse before throwing out





August 25 2014 - 36 notes







August 25 2014 - 1 note



How serious is California drought? Check out these before and after pictures, taken only three years apart. - Imgur

This is so terrifying. 3 years, guys. 3 years. 





August 22 2014 - 57 notes



The landscape of electric charging stations

brandondonnelly:

image

The car had a profound impact on the landscape of our cities (and that’s probably the understatement of the year). Not only did it force the decentralization of our cities (i.e. sprawl), but it dotted the landscape with gas stations and other things that cars required.

According to the…





August 22 2014 - 67 notes



photoatlas:

Germany produces over 50% of it’s energy using solar power while the US is only at .23%.

But hey, we’re progressive too.  Taco Bell now serves breakfast!





August 22 2014 - 93 notes



theenergyissue:

Chanel’s Eco-Couture: Wind Turbines and Solar Panels at the Grand Palais

The Chanel show at Paris Fashion Week, anticipated as much for its extravagant runway sets as its clothing, made an unusual nod to sustainability for its spring/summer 2013 collection. Rotating wind turbines lined a runway covered with a solar panel-like grid under the airy, glass-vaulted Grand Palais. Models, dressed in gossamer shifts, brightly-hued tweeds, and oversized fake pearls, weaved between the giant white columns. According to Chanel’s creative director and head designer Karl Lagerfeld, the show was meant to capture a certain optimism, freedom, and buoyancy. By associating renewables with luxury, fashion, and aspirational glamour—not to mention the famed Chanel label—Lagerfeld placed a powerful cultural stake in sustainability. Though the excess of high fashion has historically been at odds with this sentiment, the Chanel show still contributed a significant cultural message. Indeed, even the so-called tsar of the fashion world noted that “energy is the most important thing in life—the rest comes later.” If Lagerfeld takes his statement to heart, perhaps the next Chanel collection will be produced sustainably as well.